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Conostylis aculeata

Australian native plants that I grow – a few words
By Jeff Howes

Conostylis aculeata - a great ground cover

Common name: Prickly conostylis

The Conostylis genus is endemic to Western Australia and is found mostly in the south west corner of that state where they generally grow in well drained sandy soil. There are some 45 species and are all perennial, tufted herbs and are closely related to the Kangaroo Paws. The genus was first formally described by botanist Robert Brown in 1810 in Prodromus Florae Novae Hollandiae.

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AIMS

aims  

The aims of the Society are:

  * To foster and promote appreciation, study and participation in growing and propagating Australian native plants
* By lawful means, foster, support and promote the preservation and conservation of Australian native plants
* To encourage the use of Australian native plants in home gardens and public places
* To improve native plants as garden subjects
* To interest nurserymen in propagating & supplying
Australian native plants to the public
* To increase and disseminate general knowledge of Australian plants

The aims are broad and allow us to respond to changing needs and priorities and to encompass all aspects of Australian plants.

To join the society please print, complete and return the form obtained here.

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Members

members

 

Members are from all age groups and ways of life from amateurs who want to learn a bit more about Australian plants to professionals - from artists, florists, farmers and nurserymen to plant scientists: anyone who has an interest in Australian flora.

Many members enjoy Australian plants as garden subjects in the suburbs or the challenge of propagating and cultivating difficult to grow species or finding and propagating unusual forms of plants; many contribute to conservation, education, study of bushland or the awakening of a love of the Australian flora in others; others grow Australian plants commercially, many enjoy travel looking at Australian plants in their normal habitat, and photography. For many, membership of the Society is a way of meeting like minded people.

Members who have a professional interest in Australian plants can obtain information outside their specialised area. Some members who do not work with Australian plants for a living but have qualifications in botany, horticulture and so on, find satisfaction in using their knowledge in a leisure activity. For many members of the Society it is a relaxing and enjoyable activity and their first involvement with Australian plants. The Australian Plants Society also has among its members local government authorities, schools, other societies, libraries, corporations and government bodies.

To join the society please print, complete and return the form obtained here.